Paris Jackson vaguely defends father, reacts to HBO's 'Leaving Neverland'

WATCH: Paris Jackson vaguely defends father Michael in reaction to HBO's 'Leaving Neverland'

Following the conclusion of HBO’s highly-anticipated Michael Jackson exposé, Leaving Neverland which suggests the “King of Pop” sexually abused two children in the 1990s — fans and former followers are now divided in how they feel about the late singer.

Since its premiere in March, a number of news outlets have been looking to different members of the Jackson family for comments regarding their stance on the Beat it rocker’s alleged sex crimes.

Paris Jackson, the singer’s second child and only daughter, was just 11 years old when her father died on June 25, 2009.

In wake of the gruesome documentary, many fans and supporters have tweeted to the now 20-year-old to offer her their love and support.

The young Jackson had not commented on the film until this week. She was prompted to react after becoming subject of a number of presumptuous reports.

An article was published earlier this week by Gay Star News, which claimed she believed “her father innocent of sexual abuse,” as a response, she decided to break the longstanding silence over Twitter.

“I actually haven’t made any statements yet,” she replied. “Especially regarding how it affects my work life. You guys are reaching a bit.”

The tweet was published on March 6, however, has since been deleted. “At least this wasn’t a disgusting and attacking article though,” she concluded, subtly hinting her opinion on the viral Dan Reed-directed documentary.

Paris Jackson attends the 2019 Vanity Fair Oscar Party hosted by Radhika Jones at Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts on Feb. 24, 2019, in Beverly Hills, Calif.

Paris Jackson attends the 2019 Vanity Fair Oscar Party hosted by Radhika Jones at Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts on Feb. 24, 2019, in Beverly Hills, Calif.

Dia Dipasupil/Getty Images

READ MORE: ‘The Simpsons’ to pull episode featuring Michael Jackson’s voice: reports

Following Jackson’s silence-breaking tweet, she received an influx of angered, yet mostly supportive messages in defence of her father. She followed up with, “Y’all take my life more seriously than I do,” she wrote in a tweet.

In response to this, many dedicated Michael Jackson fans were made upset by her “zen” and “casual” demeanour. Some even pointed a finger, claiming that she didn’t care about her father or his legacy.

Jackson was calm in her response to these claims, adding that “tabloids” and supposed “lies” don’t account for the actual truth or bigger picture in general.

“I know injustices are frustrating and it’s easy to get worked up. but reacting with a calm mind usually is more logical than acting out of rage,” she wrote in a Tweet.

“Also … it feels better to mellow out,” she continued. “Smoke some weed and think about the bigger picture. Chillax my dudes.”

WATCH: The late King of Pop, Michael Jackson, had many allegations made against him based on his relationships with children.

“They want to tear his name down and stop playing his music,” wrote one user. “They do that to everyone with a good heart tries to make a difference,” Jackson replied.

“Do you truly believe they stand a chance?” she asked, referring to the attack on her father’s longstanding musical legacy. “Relax and have peace.”

In a final tweet addressing the rumoured opinions about her father’s innocence, Jackson tried to make a more social and political statement regarding inaccurate news articles, insinuating that they’re only ever written for a reaction.

“If everyone reacted this way towards articles, they’d stop making lies and start writing actual news,” concluded Jackson.

“Y’all dissect my tweets more than 7th graders cutting open a rat for the first time, I mean… damn,” Jackson wrote ironically only a week prior to the speculation.

Michael Jackson appears at the balcony of the Adlon Hotel with an unidentified child Nov. 19, 2002, in Berlin, Germany.

Michael Jackson appears at the balcony of the Adlon Hotel with an unidentified child Nov. 19, 2002, in Berlin, Germany.

Olaf Selchow/Getty Images

READ MORE: Michael Jackson fans furious with Oprah following ‘After Neverland,’ urge people to #MuteOprah

Although none of them have admitted to seeing the movie, various members of the Jackson family previously spoke out against Leaving Neverland in January, claiming it was “a public lynching” against the late singer.

“This documentary is not telling the truth. There has not been one piece of evidence that has corroborated their story,” claimed 61-year-old Marlon Jackson during an interview with CBSGayle King.

Since the Smooth Criminal singer first went on trial in 1993, his family has consistently defended him; claiming that he had no ill-intentions with any of the children he became close to.

WATCH: Jermaine Jackson speaks out against ‘Leaving Neverland’ documentary

READ MORE: Michael Jackson accusers detail alleged sexual abuse in first TV interview

“I don’t have to see the documentary, added Jackie Jackson, “I know Michael, I’m his brother.”

“I know what he stood for and what he was all about — bringing the world together and making kids happy.”

The supposed victims, Wade Robson and James Safechuck, came forward in 2013 and 2014, respectively. Together, with the same attorney, they launched lawsuits against the Jackson Estate.

In 2017, both cases were dismissed due to the statute of limitations.

WATCH: ‘Leaving Neverland’: What parents can learn after the Michael Jackson documentary

During the premiere of Leaving Neverland, the Jackson estate made two of the singer’s concerts available to stream “for a limited time” on YouTube.

The 1992 concert Live in Bucharest (The Dangerous Tour), was available, free of charge, during the first part of the documentary, while the Live at Wembley Stadium concert premiered the following day.

Many believe the Jackson estate’s actions were made to derive or “distract” viewers from signing up for HBO and watching Leaving Neverland.

Michael Jackson appears outside the courtroom at the Santa Maria Courthouse during a break in his child molestation trial May 23, 2005, in Santa Maria, Calif.

Michael Jackson appears outside the courtroom at the Santa Maria Courthouse during a break in his child molestation trial May 23, 2005, in Santa Maria, Calif.

Aaron Lambert-Pool/Getty Images

READ MORE: Michael Jackson sexual abuse allegations: A timeline

Whether it be the handful of sexual abuse allegations made against him, the premiere of Living with Michael Jackson (2003), Leaving Neverland or After Neverland, many different things have contributed to the dwindling of Jackson’s persona since 1993.

To this day, the truth about Jackson remains unknown, but the singer was never found guilty of any crime in a court of law.

Jackson denied all sexual assault accusations throughout his life, and since his death in 2009, he’s been unable to either defend himself in the court of public opinion, or confess to any of the alleged crimes.

adam.wallis@globalnews.ca

© 2019 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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